Monthly Archives: July 2016

Sometimes Solutions Aren’t So Simple… Patience, Perseverance and Compliance!

In this day and age, where time is money, people often look for a quick fix solution to their problems. And if results are not achieved yesterday, these people are quick to move on. Sometimes, coming to see an osteopath (or physio, GP etc…) will not be enough by itself, and patience and perseverance is required. Even more essential, however, is compliance.

Osteopathic treatment on its own can often be enough. In many cases, however, what is done by the individual in between treatments is as important as the treatment itself. There are many examples of how poor patient compliance can be damaging to the effect the person is hoping to achieve through seeing an osteopath.

One example is as follows… A person comes to see the osteopath, suffering with neck and upper back pain. The osteopath is likely to advise the person, in between treatments, to carry out stretching and strengthening exercises to aid in the treatment of this condition. The person will be shown how to stretch the tightened front chest muscles, and how to strengthen the weakened upper back muscles. If these exercises are not carried out, treatment will not be as effective, as each week, following treatment, the person will note immediate improvement lasting for a couple of days, then regressing back to original pain patterns. It is, therefore, vital that the person carries out the advice given.

Another example… A person comes to see the osteopath, complaining of pain in the elbow following playing tennis. The osteopath treats the complaint and then advises immediate rest for a few days and to apply ice to the area of the complaint to prevent swelling. Again, this advice is ignored, the pain remains and treatment proves ineffective.

All advice given is to supplement the treatment given by the osteopath in the session. Osteopathy does not itself cure the body of disease and pain. Osteopathy removes the obstacles within the body, preventing it from healing itself. Patient compliance with advice is a key component of this…

If you have any aches and pains, it may be worthwhile coming to see us at Atlas Osteopathy (with clinics in East Finchley and Moorgate, as well as the option of home visits), where we can explain your problems to you, why they occur and whether or not you are suitable for osteopathic treatment. Often this can be done via email or on the phone.

Arthritic Pain… It comes and goes, never the same…

Pain patterns can often be a useful way of determining what is happening with your body and what the cause of your pain and discomfort may be. It is not a definitive diagnosis, simply a method by which factors can be included and excluded to form the correct diagnosis. So what is meant by pain patterns in this article? This is about daily and monthly pain patterns, i.e. when pain is felt, when it gets better or worse, and for what reasons.

The osteopath will often ask what your daily pain pattern is and may ask whether the pain get worse during the day or is it worst in the morning. This is to ascertain what type of condition you may be suffering from. There are, generally speaking, three main groups in to which these conditions are split in to…

Pain and stiffness in morning – these are generally inflammatory conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Pain is worst in the morning as you will likely have been sedentary laying in bed sleeping for the night. The joints in your body aren’t moving, so the joints can stiffen up and become painful in the morning when you wake up and begin to move about.

Pain and stiffness in evening or after use – these are conditions that cause pain when the joints have been used, and consequently the pain is felt in the afternoon and evening. Conditions such as osteoarthritisand osteoporosis can cause pain after time spent walking and moving, as the joints can become irritated and swollen after use.

Pain that comes and goes or on movement – this type of erratic pain is usually related to movement and is therefore related to muscular or ligamentous pain. Muscular pain will present on movement and is likely to be a sharp pain, whereas ligamentous pain, also on movement or when static in a non-neutral position, will likely be a dull aching pain.

It is therefore useful for both you and your osteopath if you can make a note of your pain patterns so that too much time isn’t spent on your first visit determining these bits of information, which are useful for diagnostic purposes.

If you have any aches and pains, it may be worthwhile coming to see us at Atlas Osteopathy (with clinics in East Finchley and Moorgate, as well as the option of home visits), where we can explain your problems to you, why they occur and whether or not you are suitable for osteopathic treatment. Often this can be done via email or on the phone.