Monthly Archives: December 2017

I’m out of my mind, think you can wait… I’m way off the line, think you can wait…

Depression is a serious illness, or mental disorder, characterised by an all-encompassing low mood, accompanied by low self-esteem and loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities. It is wholly different to the common experience of feeling miserable, unhappy or fed up for a short period of time. When a person is depressed, they may feel periods of extreme sadness, that can affect daily living, lasting for weeks or even months.

Depression significantly affects a person’s family and personal relationships, school or work life, sleeping and eating habits, and health in general. The impact it has on functional well-being has been equated to chronic medical conditions such as diabetes. Insomnia is also common among the depressed, with typical pattern being that of a person waking up very early and not being able to get back to sleep. The person may also have difficulty in getting to sleep initially. Hypersomnia, or oversleeping, affects ~15% of the depressed population too.

A depressed person may report symptoms of depression such as fatigue, headaches or digestive problems. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), physical complaints are the most common in developing countries. Appetite also decreases, with resulting weight loss, although the opposite can occasionally occur. Others may also notice that the affected individuals behaviour is either irritable or lethargic.

Depression is fairly common, with around 1 in 10 experiencing depression at some point in life. Exact numbers are difficult to gather, as people often do not seek help or are formally diagnosed with the condition. Women are more likely to suffer depression than men, and 1 in 4 women will seek help for it, whereas only 1 in 10 men are likely to do the same. Men are far more likely to commit suicide than women, perhaps as a result of them being more reluctant than women to seek help. It could also be due to other factors, such as substance misuse, unemployment or social isolation.

Depression can affect people of any age, including children. Studies have shown that around 5% of children aged between 5-16 have suffered from depression. Those with a family history of depression are also more likely to suffer themselves. Depression is still seen as a slightly taboo subject, with many people believing that it is not a real illness, or that it is a sign of weakness or admission of failure. This is simply not true, as depression is a real illness with real effects. With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery from this illness. It is important to seek help from your GP or healthcare practitioner if you think you may be depressed.

If you would like more information on Osteopathy, how to deal with the physical symptoms of depression, or are simply unsure whether osteopathy can help with any problems you may have, it may be worthwhile coming to see us at Atlas Osteopathy (with clinics in East Finchley and Moorgate, as well as the option of home visits), where we can explain your problems to you, why they occur and whether or not you are suitable for osteopathic treatment. Often this can be done via email or on the phone.

I was thinking it over by the snack machine, I thought about you and a candy bar…

Diabetes is divided into two types, type I and type II. Type I diabetes develops when the insulin producing cells in the body are destroyed and the body is unable to produce any insulin. Insulin allows glucose to enter the cells in the body where it is used as fuel for energy. With type I diabetes, insulin can no longer be produced, so glucose builds up in the blood. The reason for the destruction of these insulin producing cells is not fully understood, but thought to be triggered by a virus or infection. This type of diabetes can develop at any age, but usually under the age of 40, and predominantly in children. It accounts for 5 – 15% of diabetes sufferers, and is treated with daily insulin injections, a healthy diet and regular physical activity.

Type II diabetes develops when the body can make some insulin, but not enough, and the insulin that is produced does not function correctly – insulin resistance. With insulin not functioning correctly, glucose cannot enter the cells, and again, builds up in the blood. This type of diabetes usually occurs over the age of 40, though can appear earlier in South Asian and black people, at the age of 25. A more worrying factor is that this type of diabetes is becoming more common in young children, adolescents and young people of all ethnicities, highlighting the need for dietary changes and physical activity in children. It accounts for 85 – 95% of diabetes sufferers, and is treated with a healthy diet and regular physical activity. In addition, medication/insulin is often necessary.

Children and young people especially, with this increase in childhood onset diabetes, should partake in at least an hour of moderate physical activity per day. Activities such as brisk walking, dance, active play and sports are all included. Physical activity will help to improve blood glucose, improve fitness, prevent excess weight gain, lower blood pressure and keep the heart healthy. In addition, a good diet is also extremely important. 

If you would like more information on Osteopathy, how to deal with diabetes, or are simply unsure whether osteopathy can help with any problems you may have, it may be worthwhile coming to see us at Atlas Osteopathy (with clinics in East Finchley and Moorgate, as well as the option of home visits), where we can explain your problems to you, why they occur and whether or not you are suitable for osteopathic treatment. Often this can be done via email or on the phone.